Tips Following Your Dermagraft Application

Here are several ways you can help your diabetic foot ulcer heal:

Bandage

Manage your dressings.

Do not disturb your ulcer or dressings for at least 72 hours (three days) after the application of Dermagraft. After this, dressing changes are at the discretion and direction of your healthcare provider.

Your healthcare provider will determine the frequency of additional dressing changes and provide detailed instructions on proper wound care.

Calendar

Return for your Dermagraft appointments.

You are expected to return for follow-up treatments on a routine basis until the ulcer heals or until you are discharged from treatment.

walker

Keep weight off the ulcer.

Off-loading relieves pressure around the ulcer. Increased pressure or stepping on an unprotected foot can slow the healing process.

plus

Watch for infection. 

Check your feet daily for changes in the ulcer. Signs of infection may include:

  • Swollen, red, or red-streaked skin near the ulcer
  • Discharge, drainage, foul odor, warmth, and/or pain around the ulcer
  • A rise in temperature/fever
  • An unexpected increase in blood sugar
no_drop

Avoid topical agents.

Refrain from applying any topical agents (i.e. creams or lotions) or medications on the ulcer.

no_spry

Cover your ulcer when bathing.

Keep the ulcer and dressing dry, as instructed by your healthcare provider.

doctor

Contact your healthcare provider. 

If at any time you notice infection or experience pain or discomfort at the DFU site, contact your healthcare provider right away.

boot

Wear your off-loading device.

Wear the treatment shoe or off-loading device if prescribed by your healthcare provider.

Do not go barefoot, even when inside.

If your walking aid is not comfortable to use, or you are having problems with it, let your healthcare provider know immediately.

wheelchair

Use provided walking aid.

If your healthcare provider has asked you to use a walking aid such as a cane, crutches, walker, or wheelchair, be sure to use this aid according to the instructions. These devices may help with balance, especially if you are not used to wearing a treatment shoe.

shoe

Wear proper footwear.

If a shoe insert becomes worn out, let your healthcare provider know immediately.

If your treatment shoe or off-loading device does not seem to fit properly, let your healthcare provider know immediately. Report any new areas of redness or irritation to your healthcare provider. Small adjustments may be needed to ensure optimal healing and to prevent new ulcers from developing.

sock

Check the condition of your socks.

Wear clean, dry, properly fitting socks with your treatment shoe. Do not wear socks or stockings that are torn, have been mended, or have seams in them.

Discuss the Following with Your Healthcare Provider: 

Related medical issues

If you have a medical problem that you think may be related to the treatment of your ulcer, talk to your healthcare provider.

Dermagraft has not been studied in patients under 18 years of age, in ulcers over a Charcot deformity of the midfoot, or in patients receiving corticosteroids or immunosuppressive or cytotoxic agents.

Pregnancy

Dermagraft has not been studied in pregnant women. Before treatment,
make sure your healthcare provider knows if you are pregnant or if you may become pregnant.

Other medicines

Because some medicines may interfere with the healing of your ulcer, it is especially important that your healthcare provider knows if you are taking any other medications.

If at any time you notice infection or experience pain or discomfort at the diabetic foot ulcer site, contact your healthcare provider right away.